Lateral Thinking Certificate-Advanced (LTC-A) – Lesson #05 –Introduction to Memes

There are the common memes spread via the Internet, often through social media, that are funny images paired with a concept or catchphrase. They’re called internet memes. But, these are just the top of the meme iceberg. There’s a lot more going on with the real power and behaviour of memes than just trivial internet jokes.

• Click here to view this lesson’s tutorial (43 mins). For context note that the time of filming was prior to COVID-19 to be declared a pandemic …

DFQ #05: What, in your opinion, was the most useful idea you got from this lesson?

PS If you are into memes here’s some further reading – my fastbook Antidote! – a 15 min read. For context note that the time of publication was before COVID-19 was to be declared a pandemic …
https://schoolofthinking.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Antidote-2.pdf

31 thoughts on “Lateral Thinking Certificate-Advanced (LTC-A) – Lesson #05 –Introduction to Memes

  1. Very interesting perspectives on religion and science which fulfil a basic human need to try to make sense of things around us. – Religion uses inspiration and faith while science observation and experimentation. – Religion focus on absolute truth while science on fuzzy truth. – Religion use authority while science use questioning.

  2. If anything, a meme is visual which corresponds to the way your mind works. You do not think in words but images and a meme is a specific set of words formatted in a visual way. These words are chosen to create images in your mind which correspond with your current view point or set of beliefs. Those are the memes that stick in your mind.

    I find it interesting that the Antidote looks at religion as a whole but singles out Christianity.

  3. 1. I need to determine what in my business I need to X10. Not the end results, ie. profit, but the activities that lead to more profit.
    2. Memes are like viruses, they seek to replicate
    3. X10 is possible through replication
    4. X10 thinking must become part of my culture, not a part time activity

  4. Interesting to learn how most memes aren’t true is our emotional response to the meme or how it may influence our point of view whether it gets copied or not to replicate themselves. The sales culture in America “did you get the deal”?. CVS2BVS Did you open the sale a unit of service measure the number of contacts and multiply it X10.

  5. The idea that memes acquire is came as a shocker to me. However it has established firmly in my mind that we must be careful of how we relate to and use memes. Thinking outside the box to the advantage of a business was clearly outlined in the example of google. The advert part of their business which is the main income source came as a result of doing things outside the core of their business. Useful session.

  6. Thinking of ideas from a biological perspective, as a survival design pattern. Very powerful idea, especially in marketing and leadership. Another good example of lateral thinking.

  7. The challenge of responding to memes that have survived for generations but that are wrong. The example I’ve heard is that spinach isn’t high in iron, a mistake was made in the initial analysis and once it went public it has proved to be impossible to change the original meme.

  8. The concept of memes and their importance both historically and in the currently   leads me  to rethink  numerous ‘truths’ that I have internalized and passed on to those with whom I come into contact. Rethinking beliefs is not an  overnight  or easy task.   PRR  is probably the best way to approach  this and also  reading  some of the books Micael   highlighted in his booklet  ‘Antidote’. Definitely a work in process.   

  9. The idea virus is very contagious.It is transmitted more widely and faster now as a result of advances in technology.To protect yourself you need to be equipped with x10 tools.Replication works for both ‘good and bad memes’

  10. I think Memes are shorthand communication and are strengthened and propagated by confirmation bias. The Meme must resonate with the victim in order to stick. We must be aware of how this works and use it or lose it depending on your objective.

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