APPLY FOR SPECIALIST:

The Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) has cultivated a tradition of strong, empirically based teaching and research in contemporary experimental psychology.

Our 28 faculty, 70 graduate students, and many of our 2400 undergraduate majors carry out leading edge research in several core areas of experimental psychology, including cognition and the perceptual sciences, developmental and evolutionary psychology, neuroscience and behavior, and social psychology.

The department’s commitment to interdisciplinary pursuits are reflected in exciting new research and teaching collaborations with a variety of other disciplines, including the biological sciences, anthropology, communication, educational psychology, linguistics, and sociology.

One of 10 campuses of the prestigious University of California system, UCSB provides an exciting intellectual environment in a setting of natural beauty between the Santa Ynez mountains and the Pacific Ocean.

The Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences is committed to fostering a diverse community of scholars and students, regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, age, religion, language, abilities/disabilities, sexual orientation, gender identity, socioeconomic status, or geographic region.

true 1. in accordance with fact or reality. 2. genuine; not spurious or counterfeit.
– Oxford English Dictionary

 

The very short version of this two-part article is simply to know how to ask and how to get a good answer to the direct and searching question: Is it true? That’s it and good luck.

The longer version

However, for those who want a little more we can continue with the longer version where we will unpack this simple but very powerful question and learn more about how to use it and how to be sure to get a good answer. This is the first and most basic question of science: Is it true?

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/JQ7u-ET34i0/maxresdefault.jpg

Fasten your seat belts! It’s a bit of a rocky ride.

My primary motivation for this article is for the particular welfare of the vulnerable young brain which is exposed, for hours and hours every day, to the bare, intimate and unchaperoned screen of a personal smartphone.

Other current gadgets, too, like laptops and gametops and the accelerating and careening future into … OMG … the internet of things!

http://monipag.com/antoine-michel/wp-content/uploads/sites/2220/2017/05/internet-of-things-adoption-prediction.jpg

Frightened of stranger danger at the end of their street youngsters are lovingly driven to school in the morning and picked up in the afternoon.

Yet, these young brains, naked and unprotected with their latest smartphone never far from their grasp, are then set free to blindly venture forth into a world of hackers and trolls, tricksters and cybercriminals, and bullies and the bogeyman!

https://www.ourphn.org.au/wp-content/uploads/Children-on-ipad-in-car-862x575.jpg

Children are absurdly inexperienced, insecure and ill-equipped in their approach to the crackling chaos of the internet–the 24/7/365 whirling, howling, cacophonous wilderness of the greedy grasping global marketplace with its siren songs, ferocious fads, toxic wastes and vicious moods, its callous explosions, its viral plagues and epidemics and cruel and sudden extinctions.

These hidden minefields of traps and predators are putting capricious end to the promising future, safe conduct and healthy development of their most precious possession. Their brain.

While kids probably already have good anti-viral protection for their laptops and smartphones my concern here is that they also should have equal protection for their greatest gadget of all. Their own personal necktop computer.

http://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/image/upload/t_original/eb2nsawulsjxodzltneb.png

These days you need not just protection for your gadgets but you also need personal protection against infection from malware in your necktop computer. Protection from fake news and fake truths.

Develop the protective habit of asking (and getting a good answer to) the question: IS IT TRUE?

It’s like a condom for your brain.

 

GO TO PART TWO:

PART TWO: Two Kinds of Truths

 

What is true?

true 1. in accordance with fact or reality. 2. genuine; not spurious or counterfeit.
– Oxford English Dictionary

 

Offline or online, the world is a wide web of truths. It’s a shopping mall. A huge marketplace of all kinds of truths. Little truths. Big truths. There are many, many truths. Millions of them. These truths live in brains and are, literally, hopping about from brain to brain via smartphones all day long, 24/7. Yes, 365.

http://static.digg.com/images/cdbadb6315724a5285341b24f64b4b44_8ffdf2a0dddb4026a0355bbe9646e6e0_header.jpeg

There are all kinds of truths that want to live in your brain. Some are true and some are untrue. There are acquired truths. There are real truths. There are new truths and old truths. Unscientific and scientific. Low-probability and high-probability. Dormant and dominant. Lazy and busy. Simple truths. Complex. Vicious and virtuous truths. Dumb. Clever. Logical and lateral. Popular truths and secret ones. Fast truths and slow truths. There are convenient truths and inconvenient truths. etc. etc.

I’ve repeated the OED definition of true again at the head of this chapter because we can divide all these truths into two general categories: fake and real.

https://cdn.psychologytoday.com/sites/default/files/blogs/38993/2011/03/56749-48508.gif

To paraphrase the OED, fake truths are spurious and counterfeit. Real truths accord with fact and reality.

There are hives of truths, megahives, There are places that host replicating truths. For example Facebook and Wikipedia and Weibo. Here there are millions of truths buzzing about from brain to brain on second-by-second

transactions at the speed of light across the wired world. Some truths are better at replicating than others. Some win. Some lose.

Remember, truths always need homes to live in and these homes are human brains. The most successful truths are the ones that are good at acquiring brains. They spread, virally, from brain to brain across the web.

Other truths are less successful and some may not even survive. This is the darwinian fate of truths. Replicate or die!

Now. This is the thing. Get ready for may what come as a big shock. Because the cognitive consequences of this next insight are huuuuuuuge!

The most successful truths are not always the real truths!

Fake truths often spread faster than real truths. Counterfeit memes are often more popular than facts. Convenient truths may acquire many more brains than inconvenient truths.

So, from now on, we may need to divide all the truths in the world into two general categories: fake and real.

  • Real truths are those truths that are supported by facts and most accord with reality. They have the balance of evidence on their side.
  • Fake truths are those that are simply good at getting replicated into your brain but are not real truths at all.

https://peakengineering.files.wordpress.com/2015/05/inconvenient-truth.jpg