••• Click through to ScienceDaily (Mar. 14, 2012)

Shyness may be the result of deficits in two areas of the brain, new research from Vanderbilt University finds. Extremely shy or inhibited individuals are typically slow to acclimate to new people.

Shyness may be the result of deficits in two areas of the brain. (Credit: © StefanieB. / Fotolia)

 

••• Click through to ScienceDaily (Mar. 14, 2012)

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4 thoughts on “Shyness Study Examines How Human Brain Adapts to Stimuli

  1. Teachers in the nursery schools should be educated in this area so that they handle shy kids with utmost care. No research is of any use if the result is not implemented at grass root level. If care is taken at this level only then can one expect a fruitful outcome. Thank you.

  2. To me shyness is often a by product of poor parenting and sadly more often than not they are the well educated buffoon parents.
    Confucius said ” The superior man is poised and at ease in any situation (while) the inferior man is self conscious”. Both are learned habits.

  3. Shyness what’s that? -I’ve always thought that “what would embarrass me would make others leave the country!