Measurement is a very important skill for the brainuser to develop. Let’s look at units of measurement. It’s very helpful, when trying to measure things, to have a unit of measurement. Having a basic unit of measurement means you can keep score and then compare one score against another.

For example, the whole metric system uses a number of units of measurement based on the decimal (or 10) system. We have metres, litres, dollars and grams. So, if you want to measure how far you have to travel to work you can do so and the answer may be 10 metres if you work at home or 10 kilometres if you don’t.

You can use dollars to figure costs and overheads and to help control them and bring them down. You can also use dollars to figure revenues and sales results and help move them up.

Metrics – Measuring Your Job

The more you can bring metrics or measurements to aspects of your job, the more you can take control and the more interesting your job becomes. What things can you measure in your job?

– Costs – eliminations, reductions or increases?
– Accidents/safety – lower or higher?
– Sales calls – more or less?
– Delivery times – longer or shorter?
– Wastage – less or more?
– Materials used – more or less?
– Industrial disputes – fewer or more often? etc.

Decimal Cognetics

In the last lesson, we’ve already seen that a CVS can never be equal to a BVS. So, what exactly is a BVS?

A BVS is a decimal of a CVS. A CVS is also a decimal of a BVS. In other words, they are related by powers of ten. Sometimes a BVS is ten times smaller than a CVS. Other times it is ten times greater. From experience, it is usually the latter, but not always.

By decimalizing (yes, it is a word) cognetics we are introducing measurement into the brain software and we get more control. Cognetics now becomes a more useful brain tool. Remember, cognetics is decimal. In cognetics we use the number ten.

The deliberate or habitual use of the number 10 is called Tenpower.

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TOP 500: China wins top spot in 2011.

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The 36th edition of the widely cited TOP500 list of the world’s most powerful supercomputers confirms the takeover of the top spot by the Chinese Tianhe-1A (Milky Way) system at the National Supercomputer Center in Tianjin, achieving a performance level of 2.57 petaflop/s (quadrillions of calculations per second).

News of the Chinese system’s performance emerged in late October, last year. As a result, the former number one system – the Cray XT5 “Jaguar” system at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility in Tennessee – is now ranked in second place.

Jaguar achieved 1.75 petaflop/s running Linpack, the TOP500 benchmark application.The Top 500 list is dominated by machines in the United States., which is home to 277 of ranked systems.The U.S.has eight of the top 10 machines.

Deception is one of nature’s long-standing survival strategies. All of the unfolding darwinian extravaganza of life uses deception to survive — even at the level of microorganisms.

And, as any ten-year-old already knows, when it comes to human behaviour, things are rarely as they seem.

There are deceptions. There are hidden motives and hidden agendas. There are people ‘behind the scenes’. There are manipulators. There are scapegoats. There are turncoats. There are traps and ambushes. There are willing or paid agents. There are big investments and potential payoffs. There are opportunists and there are traitors.

Little wonder that situations are rarely how they seem. Rarely how they are portrayed. Nor are they what they seem to be on the surface. So what can you do? What can you use to find out what’s really happening in complex situations? What investigative tools can anyone use?

One ancient and clever tool is called cui bono.

The power of the cui bono is the most likely answer to the question: who benefits?

This is always a very useful question to ask. However, because of the very nature of deception there is not always a very obvious answer to that question.

Investigative journalism and criminal investigations may invest considerable resources in trying to construct comprehensive answers to the cui bono. They are trying to find out: who benefits most from the crime or situation that we are investigating?

The Cui Bono Test

When you are trying to uncover a much better understanding of the truth you can use the Cui Bono test. Whenever you find yourself looking to allocate suspicion or blame to agents involved in a situation ask yourself if they have passed the Cui Bono Test.

To apply the Cui Bono Test you carefully ask the questions: How did that agent benefit? Who else benefited? Who benefited more? Who benefited the most?

Is it true?
The most important question to ask is: Is it true? You can also use greyscale thinking to pursue the truth in any situation that arises.

—click through there for more on greyscale thinking

NEW YORK TIMES: It is inevitable. The muscles weaken. Hearing and vision fade. We get wrinkled and stooped. We can’t run, or even walk, as fast as we used to. We have aches and pains in parts of our bodies we never even noticed before. We get old.

It sounds miserable, but apparently it is not. A large Gallup poll has found that by almost any measure, people get happier as they get older, and researchers are not sure why.

“It could be that there are environmental changes,” said Arthur A. Stone, the lead author of a new study based on the survey, “or it could be psychological changes about the way we view the world, or it could even be biological – for example brain chemistry or endocrine changes.”

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— See also 7th Hat for Wisdom ,,,

Sleeping on a problem really can help solve it, say scientists who found a dreamy nap boosts creative powers.

They tested whether “incubating” a problem allowed a flash of insight, and found it did, especially when people entered a phase of sleep known as REM.

Volunteers who had entered REM or rapid eye movement sleep – when most dreams occur – were then better able to solve a new problem with lateral thinking.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has published the US work.

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