180px-Glass-of-water.jpg Is the glass half-full or half-empty?

The problem with this question is in the construction of the question. The question is set-up as two-box thinking rather than three-box, six-box or even ten-box thinking.

Right or wrong? Black or white? Yes or no? All examples of black hat, judgmental two-box thinking.

If you accepted the way the question has been put to you (and you don’t ever have to) and if you answered ‘half-empty’ you would be RIGHT but maybe not as effective as you could be.

Using cvs2bvs you can escape from two-box thinking—change your perception from cvs to bvs—and always choose a better outcome.

••• Click through here to see also The Necker Cube illusion •••

Yes, of course you’ve heard this before many times but it still applies to every single situation–many hundreds of them–that come your way every day of your conscious life.

Knowing this is not as important as actually doing it.

So, the important questions are:
How often each day can YOU use cvs2bvs?
How many times will you escape from YOUR
cvs today?
How can YOU use this today?

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4 thoughts on “Is the glass half-full or half-empty?

  1. At least 10 times a day. Rather than rushing into action with a half-baked plan, a better strategy would be to efficiently search for a better plan and then act.

  2. All right or wrong, yes or no two box type questions begin as a as 50% function in that you can either look from a positive productive view or from negative nonproductive view. This is the basic choice everyone has from the beginning. The more important function required from each thinker is what or how they respond, react, review and renew the situation from that time and that perspective that provides for a better view. Black hat thinking is still a productive thinking process in that there can still be many options available given the opportunity to think about the situation at hand.

  3. To use this today, is to be cognisant and maintain a conscious awareness that there is always a better view system. Most often I probably employ the better view system to a large degree as my mother raised me and my siblings to view the world rather differently to the ‘conventional’ view system. Also i have Asperger’s syndrome, so due to genetic differences or bonuses as i see them, I tend to view problems and the world rather differently to ‘conventional’ world viewers; that is I tend not to be bound by the ‘square’, constrained thinking of society. A great bonus for me and not difficult to view things differently, more positively and forever analysing is this the ‘best’ way to view the world. I am not being complacent however, and will strive to maintain a better view system especially when dealing with my children today! I will apply it to the manner in which I deal with their adolescent, at times-tedious and irritating, problems and feuds!
    How many times will I escape my cvs, hopefully regularly especially as mentioned when it comes to dealing with adolescent feuding; I will apply the bvs and ‘box’ their feuding in a different light as opposed to cvs; it may prove very helpful to their feuding systems!

  4. I was just staring at the Necker cube illusion and wondering how many conflicts could have easily been prevented if people could admit that perspective is multi-faceted and subject to illusion.